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Category : Reviews

05 Aug 2017

Review of ‘Arabian Nights’

By Laura Ings Self It has become apparent from their appearances in main house shows over the last couple of seasons that the BLT Youth Group hosts some very talented members. Arabian Nights clearly demonstrated that this talent is not limited to one or two members and indeed showcased some of the brilliant talent being nurtured by leader-directors Jessica-Ann Jenner, Richard Stewart and Hazal Han. Many of the stories of the Arabian Nights are familiar to us, but some, I […]

30 Jul 2017

Review of ‘Nell Gwynn’

by Taylor Green One great merit of Jessica Swale’s play, in addition to it being immense fun, is that you get to see Nell Gwynn not through the eyes of others but very much on her own terms. The Nell Gwynn of history, one of the first English female actors as well as the king’s favourite mistress, made an impact on those who met or saw her.  Her acting career was, in fact, brief although her comedy roles were the […]

26 Jun 2017

Review of ‘Of Mice And Men’

By Arthur Rochester John Steinbeck’s acclaimed 1937 play has long been regarded as an American literary classic and, having made regular appearances on the English stage, is today a set text in the GCSE and ‘A’ level curricula. Mike Savill, having waited years for the performing rights to become available, finally succeeded in bringing it to the BLT stage in June. The play paints a vivid picture of life in the great American depression, as itinerant workers roamed the wide-open […]

08 Jun 2017

Review of ‘The Breath Of Life’

By Roxana Graves I came away from this performance thinking. I like that. Despite that, it had been an exceptionally warm day and so it felt rather tropical in the bar. Arguably not the best day to imagine being inside a cold, slightly shabby flat on the Isle of Wight. Yet imagine I did. Frances travels to the island specifically to see Madeleine, the ex-mistress of her ex-husband Martin. Their affair, (I hesitate to call it that, it being so […]

28 May 2017

Review of ‘People’

By Laura Ings Self A Sunday afternoon stroll around the house and gardens of some ancient great pile, followed by the “sacrament of coffee and walnut cake” – these are the activities that make us quintessentially British. But does our poignant desire for things to be catalogued, retained and restored to their former glory take away from the fact that these cold exhibits with their red ropes were once people’s homes? This question – centring on The National Trust itself […]

26 Apr 2017

Review of ‘Power’

By Taylor Green This play tells the story of Louis, a young king of France who decides that he wants to rule personally. As such, it is a play about the art of politics. The title of Nick Dear’s play is aptly chosen. For Louis to take power he has to escape the domination of his mother, out-manoeuvre one ambitious politician and keep another at a safe distance. And all this is to be done when the state is weak […]

09 Apr 2017

Review of ‘Double Top’

By Peter Yolland ‘Double Top’ was originally written for the Hull Truck Theatre Company. However, this production amounted to a world premiere as the author Ron Rose kindly agreed to revise certain scenes specially for BLT. Set in the North of England, the play revolves around Marie, a recent graduate who sets up a research project with her lecturer Rob – with whom she has an extracurricular liaison – acting as her mentor. Marie’s project is to be based around […]

23 Mar 2017

Review of ‘Jumpy’

By Laura Ings Self There seems to be a rather pleasing theme running through BLT’s 2017 season where strong women and the pursuit of feminism are at the forefront of several narratives. April de Angelis’ Jumpy is no exception – rather it is the ringleader, flying the feminist flag with zeal. Director Colleen Batson’s take on the script draws out each of the different threads of the play’s feminist manifesto as we follow central character Hilary (Julie Binysh) and her […]

25 Feb 2017

Review of ‘The Heresy Of Love’

By Patrick Neylan As is often the case with serious plays, the interval talk was all about the set. Jan Greenhough’s austere, stuccoed and sensitively lit setting, offset by a stained-glass window, was a perfect metaphor for the heroine: a tiny lantern of colour amid the bleakness of religious zealotry and political manoeuvring. I wasn’t fully convinced by the script. On the page, Helen Edmundson’s story of Sister Juana, a playwright/poet nun pitted against the church in 17th Century Mexico, […]

25 Feb 2017

Review of ‘Colder Than Here’

By Richard Stewart Like letters from HMRC, it is a certainty that we are all going to die. It is a curiously human thing to be aware and conscious of our own eventual end, and much in the way of culture and thought is devoted to the subject. Laura Wade’s Colder than Here doesn’t aspire to lofty philosophical musings on life and ‘what lies after’, but its depiction of a family dealing with and preparing for the inevitable loss of […]