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Auditions

Auditions for our upcoming shows are held at the theatre. They are open to all but if you are chosen to act or work as backstage crew you will need to become an Associate Member of Bromley Little Theatre before your first rehearsal.

PLAY READINGS OVER ZOOM

Saturday January 30 at 7-30pm

THE BROWNING VERSION’ by Terence Rattigan hosted by Paul Doust

THE BROWNING VERSION by Terence Rattigan hosted by Paul Doust. If you would like to take part in the reading as an actor please contact Paul at (pddoust@hotmail.com) and please copy me in so that I can send you a ZOOM link (armourgg19@gmail.com). Paul will then send you a scanned version of the script and indicate which section you will be reading. If you do not want to read but want to listen please just inform me (armourgg19@gmail.com) so that I can also send you the ZOOM link. Below is a brief synopsis of the play and a breakdown of characters. Paul will ensure that everyone who wants to read has an opportunity and will work out who reads what section and when they ‘pass on the baton’ as it were. DEADLINE TO EXPRESS INTEREST: SUNDAY 24 JANUARY

The Browning Version – background & characters

Rattigan’s one act play “The Browning Version” is considered by many to be his very greatest work; interestingly it is also his shortest.  Opening in London just after WW2 it was hailed immediately as a modern classic; “A seventy-minute masterpiece” according to theatre critic Eric Bentley. The story concerns the loveless marriage of an aging school teacher, Andrew Crocker-Harris, and his brutally adulterous wife – Millie.  The action, frozenly restrained, is set in one room of a minor public school in England, and unfolds over one continuous period of time – a summer afternoon in 1948.This structure of single location and continuous time, coupled with its focus on familial cruelty, link “The Browning Version” directly with another play that is at the centre of the Rattigan’s drama; the great Greek tragedy “The Agamemnon”, by Aeschylus. Andrew is a classics teacher and a copy of Robert Browning’s version of the “The Agamemnon”(a gift from one of Andrew’s pupils) forms the heart-breaking turning point in this subtle, gripping and extremely moving drama. The play is nicely short for reading/discussion purposes (just a bit more than an hour).  Yet it offers excellent parts for actors, plus a huge opportunity to analyse Rattigan’s masterly command as a playwright; structure, character revelation, dialogue, theme and poetry.  A treat, then, for actors, directors and playwrights to look at.  And if you simply want to sit back and enjoy a true gem of post-war British theatre then you really couldn’t do much better.

Characters

NB: Ages aren’t of any real consequence for the reading –  simply given here for information.

JOHN TAPLOW:  A schoolboy – early teens.

ANDREW CROCKER-HARRIS:  A classics teacher – just about to retire.

MILLIE CROCKER-HARRIS: Andrew’s wife – younger than her husband.

FRANK HUNTER: An established science teacher at the school – somewhere in his thirties/forties.

DR FROBISHER: The headmaster of the school.  Just a bit younger than Andrew.

PETER GILBERT:  A very young teacher – early/mid twenties.  Taking over Andrew’s position next term.

MRS GILBERT:  Peter’s wife.

Saturday February 6 at 7-30pm

‘4000 MILES’ by Amy Herzog hosted by Colleen Batson

4000 MILES by Amy Herzog hosted by Colleen Batson. If you would like to take part in the reading as an actor please contact me-Pauline- (armourgg19@gmail.com) and I will send you both a PDF of the script and a ZOOM link.  If you do not want to read but want to listen please also inform me (armourgg19@gmail.com) so that I can also send you the ZOOM link. Below is a brief synopsis of the play and a breakdown of characters. I will let Colleen know who wants to read and she will work out who reads what section and when they ‘pass on the baton’ as it were. DEADLINE TO EXPRESS INTEREST: SUNDAY 31 JANUARY

4000 Miles – background & characters

Amy Herzog’s Pulitzer Prize-nominated play 4000 Miles was due to be performed in 2021 at the Old Vic with Eileen Atkins in the role of Viv. Twenty one year-old Leo starts his summer on the West Coast, from which he sets off cycling across America with his best friend. After weeks of no contact, his family begin to worry; soon enough, though, he surprises everyone by turning up on the Manhattan doorstep of his 91-year-old grandmother, Vera. Their two lives – one starting and one ending – suddenly collide in her Greenwich Village apartment.

Characters

NB: Ages aren’t of any real consequence for the reading – simply given here for information.

LEO JOSEPH-CONNELL -21

VERA JOSEPH – 91

BEC -21 (Young woman)

AMANDA – 19

Saturday, February 20 and Sunday February 21 at 7-30pm

WOLF HALL by Hilary Mantel adapted for the stage by Mike Poulton, hosted by Pauline Armour

Wolf Hall hosted by Pauline Armour. If you would like to take part in the reading as an actor please contact me -Pauline- (armourgg19@gmail.com) and I will send you information about how you can access an electronic script for either your phone or computer and a ZOOM link.  If you do not want to read but want to listen please also inform me (armourgg19@gmail.com) so that I can also send you the ZOOM link. Below is a brief synopsis of the play and a breakdown of characters. I will work out who reads what section and when they ‘pass on the baton’ as it were. We will read Acts One and Two on Saturday night and Acts Three and Four on Sunday night – by splitting it this way we shall be able to discuss. DEADLINE TO EXPRESS INTEREST: SUNDAY 7 FEBRUARY

Wolf Hall – background & characters

Wolf Hall begins in England in 1527. Henry has been King for almost 20 years and is desperate for a male heir; but Cardinal Wolsey cannot deliver the divorce he craves. Yet for a man with the right talents this crisis could be an opportunity. Thomas Cromwell is a commoner who has risen in Wolsey’s household- and he will stop at nothing to secure the King’s desires and advance his own ambitions.

Characters

NB: As this is such a large cast there will be an opportunity for multi-role playing and for cross gender reading.

THOMAS CROMWELL

ELIZABETH CROMWELL – his wife

GREGORY CROMWELL – their son

RAFE SADLER – Cromwell’s ward and secretary

CHRISTOPHE – a French boy and thief – Cromwell’s manservant

KING HENRY VIII

KATHERINE OF ARAGON – the Queen

PRINCESS MARY –their daughter

ANNE BOLEYN – lady in waiting to Katherine, later Queen

HARRY PERCY – a young lord, later Earl of Northumberland

THOMAS WYATT – a young knight

CARDINAL ARCHBISHOP THOMAS WOLSEY – Lord Chancellor

MARK SMEATON – his lutenist

WILLIAM WARHAM –Archbishop of Canterbury

STEPHEN GARDINER – later Bishop of Winchester

EUSTACHE CHAPUYS – French Imperial Ambassador

THOMAS CRAMNER – Anne’s Chaplain, later Archbishop of Canterbury

THOMA MORE – later Lord Chancellor

SIR THOMAS BOLEYN – later Earl of Wiltshire

GEORGE BOLEYN – later Lord Rochford

MARY BOLEYN – King Henry’s mistress

THE DUKE OF NORFOLK – Thomas Howard

THE DUKE OF SUFFOLK – Charles Brandon, the King’s friend and brother in law

SIR HENRY NORRIS – the King’s groom of the Stool

SIR WILLIAM BRERETON – gentleman of the King’s Chamber

FRANCIS WESTON – one of the King’s gentlemen

OLD SIR JOHN SEYMOUR

EDWARD SEYMOUR

JANE SEYMOUR – Lady in waiting to Anne Boleyn

JANE BOLEYN, LADY ROCHFORD – wife to George

MARY SHELTON – lady in waiting to Anne Boleyn

ELIZABETH LADY WORCESTER – lady in waiting to Anne Boleyn

WILLIAM KINGSTON – Constable of the Tower

HUMPHREY MONMOTH

ROBERT PACKINGTON

DUKE OF RICHMOND – King Henry’s illegitimate son 16 years old

HEADSMAN

And SERVANTS, MONKS, DANCERS,LORDS, LADIES, BISHOPS, GUARDS etc

Thursday 26 February at 7-30 pm

‘Sweat’ hosted by Hilary Cordery

SWEAT hosted by Hilary Cordery. If you would like to take part in the reading as an actor please contact Hilary (hilary.cordery@gmail.com) and copy me in (armourgg19@gmail.com) and we will send you information about how you can access an electronic script for either your phone or computer or a PDF if we can secure one and a ZOOM link.  If you do not want to read but want to listen please also inform me (armourgg19@gmail.com) so that I can also send you the ZOOM link. Below is a brief synopsis of the play and a breakdown of characters. Hilary will work out who reads what section and when they ‘pass on the baton’ as it were. DEADLINE TO EXPRESS INTEREST: SUNDAY 7 FEBRUARY

‘Sweat’ background and characters

‘Sweat’ won the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. The play is set in a bar in 2015 and tackles the devastating impact of loss of work and of de-industrialisation on America. Based on extensive interviews  with residents of the rustbelt town, Reading, Pennsylvania, it shows the anger and despair that helped fuel the election of Donald Trump. A powerful piece of social drama.

NB: Ages aren’t of any real consequence for the reading – simply given here for information.

Characters

All characters were born and raised in Pennsylvania

JASON – white American of German descent, 20s

CHRIS – African-American 20s

STAN – white American of German descent 50s

TRACEY – white American of German descent mid 40s to mid 50s

CYNTHIA – African-American mid 40s to mid 50s

EVAN – African-American 40s

OSCAR – Colombian-American mid 40s to mid 50s

JESSIE – Italian-American 40s

BRUCIE – African-American 40s

Filmed Performances

‘The Shakespeare Review’ by Christopher Luscombe and Malcolm Mckee,

‘The Shakespeare Review’ by Christopher Luscombe and Malcolm Mckee, which was originally presented by the RSC and is a compilation of songs and sketches by well known writers including, Alan Bennett, Fry and Laurie, Monty Python, Victoria Wood and many humorous songs inspired by the works of Shakespeare.

Up to around 35 actors could be involved as most of the songs/sketches are for one person and those that are for 2 or more could be performed and filmed in household bubbles or via a ZOOM link. performing rights are being negotiated so that we could share the filmed performances with all of our members for a limited period beginning on Shakespeare’s birthday 23 April, which gives us time to get the whole project together.

If you are interested as a performer please let Pauline Armour (armourgg19@gmail.com) know by 1 February  at the latest and please clarify if you want to perform a song or a sketch or are interested in both and I will allocate as appropriate .

PROGRAMME

Many of the following songs can be found on Youtube

Part One:

Prologue: Quoting Shakespeare – by Bernard Levin

The Music Hall Shakespeare – words by Worton David, music by Harry Fragson

Who Was William Shakespeare? – by Patrick Barlow

If You Go Down to the Vault Tonight – words by Jimmy Kennedy, music by John W Bratton, revised words by Mary Holtby

And How Is Hamlet? – by Perry Pontac

Moody Dane – words by Herbert Farjeon, music by John Pritchett

Give Us A Rest – by Sandy Wilson, additional words by Nicola Keen and Malcolm McKee

The Man Who Speaks in Anagrams – by Monty Python

Shakespeare Masterclass – by Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie

The Heroine the Opera House Forgot – words by Laurence Phillips, music by Carlton Edwards and Giuseppe Verdi, additional words by Malcolm McKee

Swap a Jest – words by Tim Brooke-Taylor and Bill Oddie, music by Bill Oddie

Away with the Fairies – by Dillie Keane

Fear No More – words by William Shakespeare, music by Stephen Sondheim

Kings Ain’t What They Used To Be – John Cooper

Carrying A Torch – words by Anthony Drewe, music by George Stiles

Giving Notes – by Victoria Wood

In Shakespeare’s Day – words by Anthony Drewe, music by George Stiles

Part Two:

PC or not PC – words by Maureen Lipman, music by Denis King, additional words by Nicola Keen

Stage Directions – by Michael Green

So That’s the Way You Like It – by Alan Bennett, Peter Cook, Jonathan Miller and Dudley Moore

Ladies of London – words by Caryl Brahms and Ned Sherrin, music by Malcolm McKee

The English Lesson – words by Adèle Anderson and Dillie Keane, music by Dillie Keane

The Repertory Actor – by Guy Boas

Wherefore Art Thou, Juliet? – by Alan Melville

Anecdotage – by Derek Nimmo

The Night I Appeared as Macbeth – by William Hargreaves, revised words by Tom Lehrer

The Curtain –  by Guy Boas

Brush Up Your Shakespeare – by Cole Porter

Curtain Speech – by Ronald Harwood

Will Power – words by Kevin Hammonds, music by Charles Miller

Let’s Do It – words by Linda Bassett and Christopher Luscombe, based on the original by Cole Porter, additional words by Noël Coward, further words by Jeremy Browne, Clive Hayward, Nicola Keen and Malcolm McKee

Put Out the Light – words by William Shakespeare, music by Malcolm McKee

Main stage production

PHOTOGRAPH 51 by Anna Ziegel. directed by Scott James

Playing dates: To be confirmed and subject to Covid

Does Rosalind Franklin know how precious her photograph is? In the race to unlock the secret of life it could be the one to hold the key. With rival male scientists looking everywhere for the answer, who will be the first to see it and, more importantly, understand it? Anna Ziegler’s thrilling play looks at the woman who cracked DNA’s double helix and asks what is sacrificed in the pursuit of science, love and a place in history. First performed to great acclaim in the UK in London’s West End in 2015 with Nicole Kidman playing Rosalind Franklin.

Auditions: (Cast breakdown)

Rosalind Franklin – playing age 30/40 –  she is a dedicated, pioneering scientist, single minded, passionate about her work

Maurice Wilkins – playing age   40/45  he is dedicated to his work, cut off from life outside science,  complex relationship with Franklin

James Watson – playing age late 20s – he is an American scientist, self confident, cocky, determined  to win the DNA race

Francis Crick – playing age 30s – he is has wit and humour, he balances a philosophical with a scientific approach to life, he works closely with Watson.

Ray Gosling – playing age 20s – he is Franklin’s assistant, although lesser known in the 1950s he is rather an unsung hero as he was responsible for the photography work which captured  Photograph 51.

Don Caspar – playing age 30s –  an American, he overtly admires Franklin as a scientist and woman, balances Watson’s competitiveness with openness and warmth.

If you are interested in auditioning for this fascinating play please contact our Artistic Director, Pauline Armour (07984 722308) who will organise an audition date and time and audition pieces. You will be sent an electronic  PDF script for audition purposes.